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Connecting the Dots

$30.00

Copyright: This PDF purchase is for a Single user for review or filing purposes only. The PDF is watermarked. If you are interested in a PDF reprint to post on your website or distribute electronically, or hard-copy reprints, please contact Marah Walsh at mwalsh@pharmavoice.com.

Product Description

Ensuring trial-supply management is an integral part of overall clinical-trials management and manufacturing can bring efficiency to development and save companies time and money.
Discussions about increasing efficiency and reducing time lines in clinical development often focus on patient and investigator recruitment for trials. But a critical area that doesn’t get as much attention is clinical-trial supplies management.
Industry experts say more effective management of the supply chain during development can result in efficiencies. Insufficient attention to the supply chain creates problems at clinical-trial sites. In some cases, because of shorter lead times, as well as fewer raw materials available, clinical sites don’t have enough of the drug being tested to administer to patients. Other times, sites have too much of the drug and much of it can be wasted. There are other oversights: companies may not use the right mode of transportation or packaging; they may not be consolidating their shipments effectively; or they may not be tracking and tracing effectively…

Experts on this Topic
Anita Dopkosky, R.Ph. VP, Marketing and Sales, McKesson BioServices, Rockville, Md.; McKesson BioServices, a unit of McKesson Corp., is a leader in clinical supply and biological specimen management. For more information, visit mckessonbio.com.
Stacy Gletzakos. Director, E-Services, Perceptive Informatics Inc., Boston; Perceptive Informatics, a division of Parexel International Corp., develops and offers a portfolio of technology-based products and services that facilitate clinical drug development. For more information, visit parexel.com.
Jim Harkness. VP, Operations and Clinical Trial Management Systems, Central Labs Unit, Covance Inc., Indianapolis; Covance is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive drug-development services companies. For more information, visit covance.com.
Jon Hess. Senior Analyst, Cutting Edge Information, Durham, N.C.; Cutting Edge Information provides research and consulting to the pharmaceutical industry and the financial services industry. For more information, visit cuttingedgeinfo.com.
Joel Hoffman. VP, Practice Management, Intrasphere Technologies Inc., New York; Intrasphere Technologies is a technology consulting firm with a core focus on the life-sciences industry. For more information, visit intrasphere.com.
Christopher Holt. VP, UPS Supply Chain Solutions Consulting Services, Alpharetta, Ga.; UPS Supply Chain Solutions has resources to manage every aspect of global supply chains, from transportation management to logistics and distribution to customs brokerage and international trade services. For more information, visit ups-scs.com.
Steve Jacobs. Associate Director, Clinical Supplies Unit, J&J Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Spring House, Pa.; Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development probes the frontiers of science in pursuit of new drugs, based on discrete molecular targets, in the areas of vascular research, neuroscience, metabolic diseases, immunology, reproductive health, oncology, virology, antimicrobials, and inflammation. For more information, visit jnjpharmarnd.com.
Roddy Martin. VP, Research, AMR Research, Boston; AMR Research provides research and actionable advice for executives tasked with delivering enhanced business process performance and cost savings with the aid of technology. For more information, visit amrresearch.com.
Eddie Montoya. Director, Service Development, Interactive Voice Response Services Unit, Covance Inc., Princeton, N.J.; Covance is one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive drug-development services companies. For more information, visit covance.com.

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