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Dear Diary: Unlocking the Patient Experience in Real Time

$30.00

Copyright: This PDF purchase is for a Single user for review or filing purposes only. The PDF is watermarked. If you are interested in a PDF reprint to post on your website or distribute electronically, or hard-copy reprints, please contact Marah Walsh at mwalsh@pharmavoice.com.

Product Description

As cost and implementation concerns over the use of hand-held electronic patient diaries begin to ease, companies are starting to recognize The potential for accessing patient feedback in real time. Electronic diaries can potentially provide better-quality data, faster time to data lock, and improved patient diary completion compliance.
Pharmaceutical companies require feedback on products in the clinic — not only from the clinicians and physicians, but also from the end-users, the patients. Accurate patient assessments of treatment effects are an important gauge, especially when developing products for pain, gastrointestinal, and other indications where objective measures may not be enough to assess efficacy.
Datamonitor estimates that between 25% and 30% of all clinical trials currently use patient diaries to collect patient self-report data. Paper diaries have been the standard tool for collecting such information. But paper diaries may not accurately reflect a patient’s symptoms or experience with a drug. Patients sometimes fill out the diaries after the fact or while waiting for their appointment with the doctor. Diaries may not be returned, or they may have missing or even extra information. Additionally, handwritten diaries can be difficult to read…

Sidebars:
Paper vs. Electronic Patient Diaries

Experts on this Topic
Serge Bodart.
CEO, Symfo, Cambridge, Mass.; Symfo is an EPD solution provider and is dedicated to helping pharmaceutical, biotech, medical-device, and other healthcare companies optimize and accelerate the drug-development process. For more information, visit symfo.com.
Maryann Cherubini. Clinical program director, Adolor Corp., Exton, Pa.; Adolor is a biopharmaceutical company that develops novel analgesics and other related therapeutics based upon recent advances in proprietary medicinal chemistry and recombinant receptor technology.For more information, visit adolor.com.
P. Alex Derchak, Ph.D. Director of clinical development, VivoMetrics Inc., Ventura, Calif.; VivoMetrics provides continuous ambulatory monitoring products and services for the collection, analysis, and reporting of subjective and physiological data. For more information, visit vivometrics.com.
Michael J. Harte. Senior VP, global sales, etrials Worldwide Inc., Morrisville, N.C.; etrials offers an eClinical platform for collecting, reviewing, and distributing quantitative subject information and educational resources for physicians and patients. For more information, visit etrials.com.
Michael R. Hufford, Ph.D. VP, scientific affairs, invivodata Inc., Pittsburgh; invivodata combines behavioral science, information technology, and clinical expertise to capture clinical-trial data directly from patients. For more info, visit invivodata.com.
Barbara Marino, Ph.D. Senior scientist, PHT Corp., Charlestown, Mass.; PHT provides mobile and Web technologies that help pharmaceutical companies simplify clinical trials by improving the process of collecting and managing accurate clinical-trial data. For more information, visit phtcorp.com.
Jason M. Packwood. Product director, clinical data management, PRA International Inc., Charlottesville, Va.; PRA is a leading clinical research organization. For more information, visit prainternational.com.
Jean Paty, Ph.D. Founder and chief quality officer, invivodata Inc., Pittsburgh; invivodata combines behavioral science, information technology, and clinical expertise to capture clinical-trial data directly from patients. For more info, visit invivodata.com.
Rick Piazza, Pharm.D. VP, product strategy, etrials Worldwide Inc., Morrisville, N.C.; etrials offers an eClinical platform for collecting, reviewing, and distributing quantitative subject information and educational resources for physicians and patients. For more information, visit etrials.com.
Stephen Raymond, Ph.D. Chief scientific officer, quality officer, and cofounder, PHT Corp., Charlestown, Mass.; PHT provides mobile and Web technologies that help pharmaceutical companies simplify clinical trials by improving the process of collecting and managing accurate clinical-trial data. For more information, visit phtcorp.com.
James D. Utterback. President, pharmaceutical division, VivoMetrics Inc., Ventura, Calif.; VivoMetrics provides continuous ambulatory monitoring products and services for the collection, analysis and reporting of subjective and physiological data. For more information, visit vivometrics.com.
Carl Yankowski. CEO, CRF Inc., Waltham, Mass.; CRF markets validated EPDs and multi-channel data capture systems for clinical trials. For more information, visit crfhealth.com.

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