A Constellation of Talent

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Taren Grom, Editor

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By Taren Grom, Editor

A salute to this year’s Healthcare Businesswomen’s Association Rising Stars. The HBA Rising Star Class of 2007 is personified by 81 outstanding women who demonstrate clear leadership abilities, have an appreciation for mentors and role models, and who are not afraid to chart a course for success for those who follow them. These extraordinary women are as diversified in their talents as the companies they represent — large and small, private and public, sponsor and supplier. The common thread that binds them together is an unwavering commitment to being the best they can be and sharing their best practices for leadership excellence with those around them. These Rising Stars are shining examples of the Healthcare Businesswomens’ Association’s mission: helping women in healthcare advance their careers. Kathy Johnson IMS Health Strong leaders partner with their colleagues and peers and motivate them toward the achievement of a common goal. Leaders know their strengths and how to maximize them; but they also know their weaknesses and have the panache for surrounding themselves with good people. Good leaders are passionate about what they do. They have a strong, consuming energy that inspires and helps others to reach their true potential. Leadership is also about “rolling up ones sleeves” to get the job done. Good leaders do not delegate, they motivate, they give people the freedom to reach their goals and learn from their mistakes, and they hold them accountable for their actions and results. A good leader provides support by giving people the right tools and resources to get the job done and serves as a coach, mentor, and cheerleader. Dana Regan Torre Lazur McCann There are three qualities that define a leader. The first is passion, passion that is exuded in every element of your life. Passionate people draw people who emulate energy and enthusiasm. The second quality is vision, the vision to see opportunity, the vision to hire the right people, and the vision to trust themselves. The third quality is empowerment, empowering employees with responsibility and accountability and empowering clients to grow. Shay Weisbrich Takeda Pharmaceuticals I define an effective leader as one who unleashes potential in others. By inspiring others to believe in the possibilities within themselves and within the organization, they then weave those possibilities together into a strategy that inspires the organization and enables success beyond the ordinary. This type of leader will see possibilities at a high level while listening carefully at the ground level to understand and relate to current realities and obstacles. The abilities to create trust and to coach others to enable their continued development and realization of possibilities are critical components of this type of inspirational leadership. Helen Evans TAP Pharmaceutical Great leadership inspires trust and respect. Effective leaders are confident, have great instincts, make sound decisions, and always conduct themselves in the most professional and ethical of manners. They lead by example. They are not afraid to challenge the status quo. Strong leaders build a team with the best people they can, resulting in higher all-round performance. They empower people to make decisions; they grow and develop people, knowing the right amount of rope to give them to learn but not enough to fail. They are loyal to their people and to their organizations. They are knowledgeable about their subject matter but more importantly about the business and easily adapt to a changing environment. They are contagiously enthusiastic and energetic and never give up their desire to do the right thing. Eileen Erdos Ernst & Young A good leader is not only defined by what she has done but how she has done it. While any one person can do great things, a true leader is able to inspire others to accomplish more collectively as a team than what any one of them can do on their own. Listening with respect, motivating with passion, and directing with purpose are the leadership qualities that inspire me. This is the kind of leader I aspire to be. Dr. Eve Wilson Innovia Education Institute When I consider leaders I most admire, several qualities stand out: integrity, persistence, dedication, and commitment to excellence are indispensable, because leaders must motivate and inspire in large part by example. Effective leadership requires a capacity to anticipate and embrace change and a talent for responding appropriately — essential traits in today’s healthcare environment. Communication is key. I define a leader as one who both teaches and learns from others, who listens and provides meaningful feedback. A leader also has a sense of humor and an ability to show grace under pressure and can provide perspective, relieve stress, and promote communication and teamwork. Dr. Janet Loesberg Pfizer I believe that emotional intelligence is an extremely important quality for a leader to possess. Leaders should know and understand their own skills, capabilities, and styles, as well as their strengths and opportunities. They can then surround themselves with people who can add diversity and additional skills and capabilities — making the team or group stronger as a whole. I believe the important qualities for leaders are to be a good listener, to be supportive of their people, to be an authentic communicator, and to inspire others to strive toward a clear vision. Linda Bennett Publicis Healthcare Communications The most important leadership quality to me is to recognize that not everyone is like you. To be a successful leader and develop loyalty you need to understand the individuals you are leading to know what motivates them, how to communicate with them, and how to reward them. Everyone brings something unique to the table, and it is important to recognize and leverage these unique qualities. You cannot make assumptions about people based upon your own goals and desires. Also, it is important to have an understanding that what is important to your employees may change and that you need to be in constant touch with them to know where they are at any given time. Jina Melnyk ImpactRx Many character traits come to mind when asked to describe the most important qualities of a leader. Empowerment is one of the top qualities of a leader within an organization. A person who is empowered by a leader will ultimately better serve the company and its clients. Why? Because the person will experience a sense of ownership, have confidence in being asked to take on a given assignment, and find that his or her opinion is acknowledged. A leader will disseminate responsibility throughout the organization as a way to tap into the best talent. Successful leaders will hire the most talented individuals to move the organization forward. As our CEO and president says, “tens hire tens.”A leader who is transparent to all levels within an organization will ultimately increase the morale of employees, allow for better decision making, and foster a collaborative working environment. Finally, while not critical, a leader who has a sense of humor and understands the power of “work hard, play hard” knows how to have fun while getting the job done. Michelle McManus Compas The most important leadership qualities are the ability to motivate others and the ability to enable others. Leaders must understand the needs and ambitions of those who will be following their directions and provide the inspiration needed for each of their team members to contribute toward reaching the goal. In addition to motivation, leaders must provide the team with the tools for success and help each of them grow to become leaders themselves. The best leaders pride themselves on having developed and nurtured new, successful leaders. Valuable leaders energize a group to believe in its purpose. They carry their team to exceed goals and in the process improve themselves. Marylou McNally Dorland A leader helps set clear goals and inspires achievement among individuals and teams. A leader should be a listener, she should be able to translate what she hears into a solid strategic picture, and she should have the communication skills to translate that picture into action with her teams. She should have a passion for the work and confidence in her teams to motivate them toward better and better business results. Melissa Barlow Solvay One of the most important leadership qualities is demonstrating an unwavering sense of empathy to the team, not sympathy, and assertively “modeling the way” for the team. A good leader would not ask her team members to do anything that she herself is not willing to do. Improvement in just this area can have a profound impact in your performance as a leader. Betsy Lane Publicis Selling Solutions Group Leaders must have the basic skills for running a well-managed business. This is the cost of leadership, if you will. Integrity, however, is the critical underpinning of leadership excellence. Doing the right thing for the right reasons is what distinguishes truly great leaders. This type of principled leadership is what effectively leads to driving the corporate vision, surrounding yourself with the best people, sharing power, recognizing your people, developing trust and respect, and running an extraordinarily successful business. Louise Koenig IMNG/Elsevier A leader is someone who has a strong belief in their organization’s objectives and who will inspire and encourage others toward those goals. A leader realizes that what seems to be difficult and challenging can be achieved through dedication and a willingness to succeed. A leader accepts positive feedback with grace and negative feedback with understanding and a desire to improve. A successful team needs a leader who has a clear sense of direction, an eye toward self-improvement, and a commitment to talent promotion and the development of the professional goals of team members. Lee Ann Kimak Wyeth You cannot be a leader if no one will follow you, which is something a mentor once told me. As a leader you need to have the skills to influence and motivate others. You need to be passionate about your vision, inspiring your team to give more than they thought was possible to reach your goals. Leaders also take risks and challenge assumptions. They respect their team members for their contributions, listen to others’ ideas, and adjust course if needed. Leadership can happen at any level, no matter the title or position; it is about the qualities somebody embodies and how a person can motivate others to succeed. Kari Seymour VoxMedica A leader is someone who inspires others to act. A leader is not always the person with the loudest voice or with all the ideas or answers, but one who provides others with the guidance and motivation to achieve the big or the small. The qualities I admire most in a leader are eloquence, enthusiasm, self-assuredness, and commitment. It is through such qualities that leaders provide that spark of inspiration for others to define and accomplish their goals. Julie Adrian Chandler Chicco Agency Leadership is about trust — trust in yourself to go with your gut and stay true to what you believe is right and trust in your team to deliver. Equally important is being a leader with a lower case “l,” which means moving about an organization, inspiring others, and affecting change not by directing but by supporting those around you. Emily Jordhamo Q.E.D. Communications The cornerstones of successful leadership are being fully invested in the successful professional development of the team, building working relationships based on mutual trust, and giving and receiving constructive feedback in an open and tactful manner. Beverley Brookshaw MedPointe Pharmaceuticals A successful leader is one who projects self-confidence, enthusiasm, and passion, and who inspires the trust, cooperation, respect, and confidence of others. A leader recognizes the potential in others and motivates/stimulates them, either by word or deed, to excel and maximize their individual potential. A leader provides the vision, expectations, and the necessary support and framework to ensure the success of the team. Leaders understand the power and influence they wield and effectively use these attributes for the overall good of the organization. Erin Brubaker GlaxoSmithKline US Pharmaceuticals A leader is someone, regardless of title, who others look to for direction, clarity, support, understanding, and courage. I find that the best, most impactful leaders are the ones who really listen to people and understand not only the “what,” but the “how” and “why” of a situation. Mary Ann Seamon JBK Associates I believe that leaders have the responsibility to set realistic goals for their teams. It is essential that once these goals have been presented that they provide sufficient guidance, allowing their team members to proceed with confidence in achieving these goals. A good leader must remain positive under less than ideal conditions, understanding that there will be both good and challenging days; revel in the good days, but be prepared for the challenges. It’s important to always remain positive and keep the other members of the team motivated and steer them toward the light at the end of the tunnel. Pamela Lippincott Spectrum Science Communications The first responsibility of a leader is to make leaders of others. My personal approach to leadership is simple: I never let my title lead. People follow officers, not offices. I always lead from below, even when I’m above. The great daily challenge for me as a leader in the communications industry is to create an atmosphere where order and progress do not stifle creativity. During my five years at Spectrum Science Communications, I have been fortunate enough to work with the best and the brightest in our field. The leaders at my firm have invested their time and talent to make a leader of me; I am committed to do the same for others. Anita St. Clair Health ED Demonstrating leadership is something that is uniquely suited to every leader’s personality. I have always admired leaders who promoted other team members’ growth even when it was outside of their area of expertise or against their own personal want or need. Leaders have the capacity to look beyond their own self interests to the needs of the individual, company, or brand and manage to fit individuals’ needs to a better job function or project at hand. Rare is the manager who can fit and understand the importance of an individual’s style and match this to the best gain of the business opportunity. The result of such leadership is loyalty, trust, and a truly high functioning team that can walk through walls. Marjorie Nelson-Perry Brand Pharm The two most important qualities in a leader include the ability to inspire others and the gift of objectivity. Inspiration involves both a flair for showmanship as well as being imaginative. Objectivity requires management to separate themselves from the fray without walking away from a situation. Leaders are defined by their actions and authenticity and what they say and do will plant the seeds of cultural change. Liz Kay Cramer The top leadership qualities include honesty, clear communications, and providing opportunities for everyone on the team to achieve success. First, I have found that honesty and accountability for my actions are the best ways to move a team in the same direction. This best practice creates an atmosphere for others to step up to excellence. Second, even in a frenetic client-service oriented environment, I find that it’s when I slow down, take a breath, clearly communicate the goals of a project, and listen, that my team is best qualified to learn, prosper, and be most productive. Third, when I let others step up to the challenge — and remind myself that while it may not be the way I might do it, I have to let them work/interact in their own style. Not only does this give them the space to achieve excellence, I learn more as well. Valerie Metil Innovex Leadership is vision and integrity. Vision involves more than proactivity; it considers short- and long-term goals and is about asking the right questions first so that a solution is at hand. Integrity involves accountability, motivation, and setting the example of professionalism. Michele Korfin CELGENE Three of the areas that a good leader has mastered are: motivation, feedback, and teamwork. A successful leader can motivate either an individual or a room full of people. This leader can motivate to the same extent whether the project is the most important for the company’s success or a routine task that needs to be done. This leader also is able to provide timely, constructive feedback to her team. Feedback ties closely with motivation. A strong leader will provide either positive feedback or constructive criticism in such a way that makes a person eager to get right back to work after the conversation. The third key area for a leader to master is teamwork. Those leaders that we look up to and aspire to be like are successful at working with diverse groups of associates throughout the organization. Good leaders also ensure they share the success and the credit with others on the team. Katie Mihelich Siren Interactive Great leadership is a combination of listening and communicating. It’s important for a leader to empower her team to create a clear vision and implement the vision effectively. The old saying, “lead by example,” is very true; however, it goes beyond just pulling up one’s sleeves and getting the work done. A true leader earns respect by giving respect to others. For this reason, integrity and honesty are also important qualities of a leader. Janine Serio LLNS Having enthusiasm, providing clarity of vision, being solutions-oriented, and remaining calm in the midst of a crisis are just a few of the things that make a great leader. It is just as important to empower your team to do what they do best, focus on their strengths as individuals, and inspire them to always raise the bar for themselves. A great leader should set an example of excellence, vision, creative direction, and make the experience fun. Leaders are nothing without a strong and trusted relationship with their teams. When a team is inspired, engaged, and motivated, the result is always success. Sacha Schroeder Surge Worldwide Healthcare It’s important to lead from the front. This begins with exceptional and collaborative client service at every level, because ideas can come from any team member. Leaders are never afraid to challenge convention or to question how claims can be made more meaningful and relevant. An overriding goal is to ensure that the team is always doing what’s best for the brand. Dr. Kimberly Irish Palio I believe the two most important leadership qualities are integrity and participation. Leaders should strive to make their actions tie back to their personal core values. Leaders with the integrity to lead in a way that is true to their own values can be trusted. Additionally, I think leaders should be open to the ideas of all employees. The benefit of empowering employees to participate in decision making is a broader view of the situation. Having the courage to embrace a diversity of ideas builds a better foundation for any type of organization. True leaders acknowledge the ideas of their colleagues that fuel the forward movement of the organization. This gesture alone yields even more participation. Jennifer Hayoun Glow Worm Leaders must give those around them the sense of what is possible. But more than inspiration, a leader must provide a concrete plan and not just a lofty vision. They need to really understand the heart of an issue, whether it is a client’s business needs, their organization’s long-term goals, or an employee’s personal development. Most importantly, a successful leader will be able to recognize the opportunities within the obstacles, articulate them effectively, and ultimately motivate people to exceed their own expectations. Meg Anderson Ortho Biotech I believe that the most important qualities of a leader are the ability to create and communicate a vision, to successfully inspire and motivate others, and to engender trust and respect. The vision should set the strategic course that inspires and motivates others to exceed expectations. Leaders engender trust by acting with integrity, and by providing respect to those with whom they work; celebrating others accomplishments; and helping others to exceed their personal and business objectives. Debbie Deaver CDMiConnect The most important leadership qualities are vision, self-motivation, an ability to motivate others, strong ethics, empathy, strength of character, passion, commitment, decisiveness, sincerity, responsibility, and respect. Together, these qualities make it possible for a leader to accomplish her goals. The definition of a leader is someone who sees possibilities and makes them happen. Leaders are not content with the status quo. They are motivated by challenges and are eager to improve things. They are thoughtful about criticism and use it for progress. Leaders emphasize the positive and seek solutions others might not have considered. They are energetic and proactive. Leaders are people who others respect and seek for direction, encouragement, and wisdom. In addition, leaders take pleasure in the success of their peers. Deanne Melloy Endo Pharmaceuticals A leader can be defined by many qualities, and two that I find to be extremely important when it comes to leadership are ownership and accountability. When leaders have ownership they have passion and the drive that will allow them to be innovative thinkers and, therefore, take risks. Ownership is accompanied by knowledge and surrounding yourself with the best of the best. Accountability is the ability to learn from past experiences, to accept praise and blame. A leader who accepts accountability is a decisive leader and moves forward with conviction and authority. Individuals want to follow this type of leader and work for them versus being managed by them. Mary Ann DIGANGI-FALLON Copernicus Group IRB One of the most important leadership qualities an individual can possess is the ability to create a work environment of trust and mutual respect at all levels within the organization. This quality is essential as a corporation navigates through changes with either business processes, technology, or even leadership. Leaders inspire their workforce to perform at their highest level and challenge them to grow as individuals throughout their careers. Deborah Tanner Covance It is important for leaders to be approachable. People at all levels of the organization need to be able to relate to a leader as a person, not just as a leader. A leader can’t be seen as someone who is out of touch, sitting in the corner office. Leaders need to have a passion for what they do and this passion will inspire the people they lead. Leaders need to have high expectations for themselves and their teams. No one can be an effective leader without having integrity and the trust of employees. A leader needs to have the confidence to surround herself with strong people who possess skills and experiences that she does not. It is important to create an environment where it is safe to challenge the thinking and allow for the debate of issues for the best decisions. Teams will continue to grow and develop their leadership skills, which is one of the most important aspects of being a leader — developing other leaders. Lastly, it’s important to never lose one’s sense of humor and fun. In today’s world, we all work extremely hard and to be able to laugh and have fun is an added benefit that will make people want to be part of your team. Alya Sherman CMI I believe that true leaders have vision and must surround themselves with the right team of people to achieve that vision. Having the instincts to identify, motivate, and reward talent is what sets a good leader apart from the follower. Leveraging the strength of the team, setting realistic goals, and being willing to take risks allows a good leader to identify opportunities others may overlook. Jane Purkis Medicus A leader is best defined by how she is viewed in the eyes of those around her. A good leader is seen not only as being passionate about her own goals but also about helping others shape and achieve their own goals. Qualities that often coalesce to create a leader include self-awareness and understanding, empathy, and a drive toward helping others bring out their best qualities. Deepika Kandula The Kinetix Group If I were to think about what qualities are most important in a leader, I would say integrity, vision, determination, ability to motivate others, empathy, social responsibility, and intelligence. People look to a leader who is trustworthy, forward-thinking, and inspiring, someone who practices open communication, who is inclusive, and who creates an environment where people can thrive. I’ve learned along the way that a truly effective leader harnesses people’s knowledge, skills, and creative energies and translates this into value. Aimee Roca Wishbone I believe that true leaders need to have strong capabilities such as vision, integrity, courage, and passion. And more importantly, leaders need to stay true to these values and call upon them daily. Growing your team, championing your creative, taking responsibility when things go wrong, and making sure the team gets the accolades when things go right are all attributes of a good leader. A respected leader must have a “I do what I say and I say what I do” attitude. Additionally, leadership includes acting as a guide to new technologies and new mediums. And the dissemination of this knowledge to the team is crucial for today’s leaders. Michelene Assad Total Data Solutions Leadership is about creating an environment where everyone, regardless of skill set, can feel empowered to develop. The environment must be motivating for people to want to be a member. A successful leader enables growth, encourages sharing ideas, and questions the process. It is equally important to remember to have fun. Bridget Cleff Shire Pharmaceuticals Strong leaders demonstrate vision, communication, and courage. Leaders must define a vision to establish a common path. They should communicate the vision and required actions with clarity and enthusiasm. This communication involves both speaking and listening. To achieve the vision, leaders must have courage. They have to have the courage to ask why and ask why not on the path to executing the vision, to lead regardless of role or position, to empower team members and to trust them to “own” their roles, to support and defend their team, and to stay true to values and integrity in challenging business situations and when facing difficult decisions. Corinne LeGoff Sanofi-aventis Agility is the key quality that characterizes today’s leaders. The environment in which the pharmaceutical industry operates is going through a number of transformations. Over the last decade, the payers and the managed care organizations have increasingly grown as key customers, the patients are more involved than ever before in medical decisions, and the life cycles of our products are becoming less predictable as patents are being challenged in a more systematic way. Success in these ever-changing market conditions is found in the ability to challenge old ways of thinking and to adapt quickly to changing customers’ needs. A leader is not necessarily a bigger-than-life hero whose biographies and management guides make the bestseller list. He or she is the manager who, regardless of his or her rank, has the ability to proactively rethink past assumptions, create a sense of urgency around challenges, and bring the right people together and excite them about the task at hand. Bebe Bernstein Flashpoint medica The ability to communicate where the company, department, or project is going, to set the vision and a plan to move forward, and knowing how to motivate those involved to achieve those goals are priceless. Leaders are trusted; they stand behind what they say and will follow through. Culture is set from the top down and the right leaders in a company make all the difference. Their integrity and honesty are palpable. People want to be inspired, so the best leaders help people see the big picture, where they fit in, and help them get there. Leaders dedicate themselves to achieving the goals and give their all. When success happens, the best leaders give credit where it is due. Leaders have the ability to listen to others and be open minded. They are humble enough to know that often the best ideas can come from anywhere and they are willing to acknowledge these insights. Lastly, they are terrific problem solvers. A laissez-faire management style does not exist within the best leaders. Rather they get involved and fix things when they have to and they plan for the future. What do you believe are the most important leadership qualities? And how do you define a leader? Who are the individuals who have played a role in your leadership development, either as mentors or role models? Erin Cramlet Stryker My father is one of the hardest working people I know. He taught me that when you are exhausted, magical things happen when you can push through that wall. My mother taught me the value of unconditional love. In business or in life people want to know that you truly care about them. My husband taught me the value of risk. I’m a more conservative person by nature, but he showed me that excellence and conventional are hardly ever used in the same sentence. I call June “The Rock.” June taught me the value of good judgment and loyalty. John is an absolutely amazing manager; he has taught me the power of team. Donna saw talents I didn’t see in myself. She taught me how to uncover talents in others and help them to use those gifts. Dr. Rujuta Srivastava Millennium Pharmaceuticals My parents taught me to be strong-willed, tough-minded, and competitive but also kind and caring. Professors Ron Dorr, Michael Schechter, and Richard Zinman (among others) encouraged me to have high expectations of myself and of others and to always look at situations and data from multiple perspectives. At Millennium, Larry Brenkus taught me how to bring technical substance and savvy to my opinions. Ian Nisbet showed me the value of codifying and selectively applying insights from past experiences to help inform current and future opportunities. Marsha Fanucci helped me develop an appreciation of the role of rigorous financial analysis in supporting business decisions. Neil Exter supported me to find a stronger voice and greater confidence as a leader of teams and as a business development negotiator. Anna Protopapas has created opportunities for me to make judgment calls, take risks, and be seen and heard more frequently by our management team and external parties. Dana Regan Torre Lazur McCann Marci Piasecki, CEO of Torre Lazur McCann, had blind faith in me. When she came to this position, she really didn’t know me or what I was capable of. Yet, she entrusted me to build this group into what it is today. I admire her passion for the business, her ability to mentor team members, and her contagious enthusiasm. Amy Duda Sudler & Hennessey When prompted to name a source of inspiration for our academic or professional careers we tend to somewhat routinely think of mentors or role models who necessarily are older, more experienced, and better paid than ourselves. This past year, through a joint sponsorship from S&H and its parent company Y&R, I had the extraordinary opportunity to participate in a hurricane recovery project in Gulfport, Miss. The work teams were organized and directed by young adults just barely out of college. Their capacity to recognize the operational and physical strengths in a rag-tag group of volunteers thrown together for four days would put professional managers to shame. In assigning people to the right job, understanding challenges and stress unique to that situation, and providing constant and good-humored encouragement, these young leaders ensured that critical rehab projects would be completed on time and well. Since then, when in need of inspiration for a work-related issue, I look to those who bring that level of passion and dedication to their responsibilities. Debbie Deaver CDMiConnect My father instilled a strong work ethic in me and encouraged me to strive for my dreams. My mother taught me the importance of compassion, friendship, and loyalty. My business partners, Dina Peck and Christine Finnamore, help me stay focused and grounded. Mary Ann DIGANGI-FALLON Copernicus Group IRB There are many individuals who have played a role in my leadership development over the years in this industry. I like to think I have aspired to learn and implement some of the best qualities from each of these many individuals whose paths have intersected with mine over the years. Rachel DiPaolo Health and Wellness Education Partners Jani Hegarty, Audrey Pezzuti, and Bonnie Welsch have all played major roles in my leadership development as both mentors and role models. We have worked together in a variety of capacities for more than nine years. Each of these women have very different work and leadership styles, and I continue to learn from each of them every day. Jani is driven to succeed. She has an indescribable ability to multitask, organize, and lead. Bonnie is meticulous, detail-oriented, and a patient teacher; always looking to help her staff grow. Audrey will always pursue an answer to a question and figure out how to do anything, especially in technology; she never gives up. They continue to grow themselves and as a result show those of us how to grasp any challenge and view it as an opportunity to learn and advance. Kathy Johnson IMS Health My direct manager, Tom Stazzone, VP of mideast sales for IMS, has been a very supportive mentor for me during the last eight years at IMS. He provides me with the support necessary to do my job well, yet encourages me to achieve on my own and specifically to branch out and get involved in all types of projects interdepartmentally to help me grow. His strong belief in me and my abilities has provided me with the confidence necessary to advance and succeed within our organization. Stefanie Vajapey BusinessEdge BusinessEdge Solutions has afforded me many mentors throughout my career, but my main inspiration has been Joanne Metta-Sullivan, who was my first manager at the company and continues to be a guiding light. Joanne put her faith in me when I expressed interest in growing from my technical background into a project manager and she was integral in positioning me for management opportunities. Now that I have become a project manager, she always makes herself available when I need her help or opinion on an issue. Throughout the years I have watched Joanne balance her professional life with a busy household, and I look to her for ideas on how to strive for such a balance in my own life. I am a Rising Star because she has shown me how to be one. Liz Kay Cramer My mother taught me early on, “You have a tongue … ask questions.” I can’t tell you how well that lesson has served me over the years. If I don’t ask, then I will not know the answer, nor will others get a sense of how I think. This is a particularly difficult skill for younger women to obtain, because often they tend not to want the spotlight. Although, from time to time, asking questions has gotten me into a little trouble, in the long run, asking questions has helped me advance my career. It demonstrates my willingness to learn, my desire to do the best job possible, and that I’m comfortable asking the hard questions, even when it’s tough to admit I don’t have all the answers; but it does show that I am working toward the solutions. Mary Ann Seamon JBK Associates My mother was my role model. When my father passed away, I was very young and my mother took on the sole responsibility of raising four daughters. She showed me strength and courage in the face of adversity. She nurtured and encouraged us in everything we attempted to achieve. She taught us to support each other, to work together, and to be close. She upheld the values of integrity, trust, and respect. Dr. Reinilde Heyrman Daiichi Sankyo I think with joy of my first grade teacher who encouraged me to be myself, of my senior history teacher who pushed me beyond my limits to get even better grades, and of my professor in genetics in medical school who encouraged my interest in science. When I joined the pharmaceutical industry, the medical director and the subsidiary general manager held an absolute belief in me. Both gave me great opportunities to learn the business aspects and they entertained great expectations, which I did not want to fail. When joining the company’s headquarters, my then manager guided me way beyond my comfort zone, and he remains a beloved mentor. All of my role models have the following in common: they have integrity, they are honest, they are extremely skillful, they believe in people, and they have high expectations and standards for others and themselves. Sarah Boyce Novartis pharmaceuticals I have been privileged to work with leaders who have incredible energy and passion for doing the right thing for patients and for the business. I also have been honored to work with several inspirational female leaders. I am honored to work and learn from Meryl Zausner; she is truly a unique leader. Her energy and love of life is coupled with a razor-sharp business acumen. She is an example of someone who has never compromised who she is and has been able to achieve outstanding results. Andy Volante has not only been my manager for the past year but a role model and mentor. He is someone who gives timely, honest feedback and has played an important role in my development. Erin Brubaker GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare I have had terrific role models — both professionally and personally — who have contributed to my leadership style. On the professional side, I have been very lucky to have worked with fantastic managers who have taught me how to build and motivate high-performing teams. On the personal side, my parents make up the perfect blend of leadership — my dad with his unwavering courage and crisp direction and my mom with her high emotional intelligence. Between the two of them, I have learned a great deal about how to approach situations and how to treat others. My husband is also a huge influence on my leadership style. As the head of operations for a large financial services organization, he has a significant amount of experience managing and leading different styles, skills, and personalities. By sharing his experiences, he has taught me how to have constructive conversations and how to fight for the needs of others. Michelene Assad Total Data Solutions I have been lucky to have several very strong mentors in my career. My earliest mentors, Neil Forte and Mary Moore, instilled strength and the “I will do it” mentality. As I switched from financial to pharmaceuticals, it was Brad Patten who showed me how to draw on the broad experiences of my past to create success in my new career. Most recently, I have been surrounded by a support group that has encouraged me to reach for the stars. This group includes Steve Gornto, Julie Kelly, Phil Bhayani, Glen Case, and Todd Forman. They remind me on a daily basis that not only can “I do it” but I can teach others to do it as well. As a Rising Star, what advice would you provide to women who are new to the healthcare arena to help them achieve their career development goals? Dr. Janet Loesberg Pfizer My advice is to really take the time to plan and develop clear goals. Put them down in black and white, and visibly post them so you can refer to them often. The goals should include work goals, stakeholder networks, career development goals and personal goals — things you want to achieve outside of work. They could also include a personal mission and vision. Each year the goals should be reviewed, updated, or changed to reflect the changing environment and personal progress. Michele Korfin Celgene For a new individual entering the healthcare field, the key to success is to always remember who the main focus is: the patient. No matter what part of the healthcare field you are in and no matter what your career goals are, the patient needs to remain a focal point for all of your thoughts and decisions. At the start of your career, you should reach out to people in your company and to key thought leaders to better understand how your work is impacting patient care. A strong leader in our field is able to successfully integrate the needs of the patients with the goals of her organization. Keeshia Muhammad Altana Pharma First and foremost, a newcomer must recognize the changing dynamics taking place within healthcare and the implications and impact these will have on the pharma industry in the future. This knowledge and foresight should help one maneuver through the changing landscape. Professionally, I find that it is important to network with key stakeholders internal and external to my organization. It is important to identify how changes in the industry are impacting your company’s ability to achieve results and how you can be part of the solution. You should seek opportunities to get involved and lead key initiatives impacting the business, be creative and innovative in your solutions, be consistent in your ability to deliver results, and master the art of communicating up. Julie Adrian Chandler Chicco Agency My advice is to be a voracious student of the industry, keep abreast of the ever-changing environment, stay true to your core values, and align yourself with people and companies that embody the same. Marylou McNally Dorland Find the people in your world who you truly respect and welcome constructive criticism from them. Praise is a wonderful validation, but we learn and grow the most when we are challenged to be more. Dr. Reinilde Heyrman Daiichi Sankyo To achieve career development goals, I encourage women to be passionate about their work. Be brutally honest with yourself and build on your strengths. Recognize your weaknesses. Rather than seeing these as areas for development, as you will be encouraged to do, find ways so that these limitations do not hinder your growth. This might mean another career path, partnering, and so on, but remain true to yourself. No matter what you do, communication is a very important aspect; thus work on speaking about your work in many different settings but especially toward higher management. Look for a role model, analyze this model’s behavior, and apply these traits to yourself. Look for a mentor, a sounding board. Be serious about your work, but accept that you are a human being with inherent flaws: there is nothing wrong with laughing at yourself. Valerie Metil Innovex I feel so fortunate to work in this industry and my advice is to encourage women to not be afraid to take educated risks with their careers. There are so many opportunities, and to “play it safe” by not exploring what is available can rob one of a chance to become more than could ever be imagined. Dr. Kimberly Irish Palio In the world of pharmaceutical advertising, it is often the account service or creative teams who receive recognition because of their daily contributions to the clients’ accounts. As a member of the medical strategies team at Palio, I was honored to be nominated because it demonstrates the importance of scientific insight both to our business and our clients. Each day doctors and patients rely on the clinical and scientific accuracy and insight that is the foundation of our communications. This recognition elevates the importance of the role I play in helping our teams and clients to understand the data, the clinical studies, and the core scientific advantage of the products our clients develop. Ultimately, it is the combination of medical insights with brand strategy and creative articulation that makes the full impact and is truly great work that makes us all proud to be in this industry. Melissa Barlow Solvay My advice would be to seek out advice from everyone. There are many articles out there giving advice on how to manage up. We constantly work “up” and have a tendency to miss out what is happening “below.” There are many lessons to be learned below and effective leaders know this. Jina Melnyk ImpactRx As a Rising Star, I would offer the following advice to a woman new to the healthcare industry or new to her career: surround yourself with people who are forward thinking, intelligent, and professional. They will expand your horizons by teaching you new concepts and ideas, how to achieve desired results, and overall, how to be successful in your career. Have a positive attitude in all your endeavors and learn to accept both positive and constructive criticism with ease. Also, you should network frequently and expand your list of contacts. Keep in contact with your mentors regularly and build new relationships in all areas of your company. Writing down your development goals each year and reviewing them with your mentors regularly will help you succeed. Mary Jo Furnbach Draftfcb Although hard work, dedication, and the pursuit of ongoing learning are all important, the first step to success is to understand what you really want to achieve in the long term. It’s important not to confuse this with goals you think you should want or goals that other people think you should be aiming for. This should be all about you. Once you’ve decided on a long-term goal, think about what steps you can take right now, such as learning everything there is to know about your product, and what you can do in the near future, such as a graduate degree. This is an ongoing process; as you reach each goal, you’ll need to reevaluate and determine what the next step should be. And don’t get discouraged. Remember, if you seem to get stuck for a while, you are still in a better place than where you started. Emily Jordhamo Q.E.D. Communications My advice for women starting out in this industry is: aim high. There is no limit to what you can achieve as long as you do not limit yourself. “Nobody can prevent you from choosing to be exceptional,” — Mark Sanborn, The Fred Factor. Rachel DiPaolo Health and Wellness Education Partners My advice is to be patient and try to learn by doing. As I reflect on my own career, the jobs that seemed so menial to me when I first started have given me great perspective and understanding at this stage. Volunteer for the challenges that are presented. I have learned so much by accomplishing the challenges that seemed insurmountable when first presented to me. You have to build the mountain as you climb it and create your own map to look back on and learn from as you move forward. Find a supportive organization that will encourage you and provide you with the tools not only for your career growth but to maintain a healthy work/life balance. Commit yourself to the organization and grow with it; this will be a very rewarding experience. Amy Duda Sudler & Hennessey In advising women at the beginnings of their careers in healthcare, I first encourage them to understand how their qualities fit within their vision of a successful career. They should evaluate which strengths they might capitalize on and what skills need extra attention. Secondly, because we recognize that most of the great communicators in history were men and that their communications skills were key to their successes, I advocate that they focus on becoming confident speakers and presenters. Engaging confidence comes from consideration of both content and context — thorough background work and astute understanding of the audience are absolute necessities for successfully presenting ideas. Lastly, I encourage women new to healthcare to understand what they find most engaging about how they spend their days and to focus on the skills needed to accomplish something rather than a specific job description. From research to marketing to communications, it is important to recognize emerging trends in healthcare and to be prepared to take on new roles and responsibilities that may not have even existed a few years ago. Dr. Rujuta Srivastava Millennium Pharmaceuticals First, regardless of your function, take the time to learn the science. It matters and demonstrating an understanding of it buys you a great deal of credibility. Second, develop your own perspective about the right strategy/direction for your company and look for opportunities to share your thinking with others in the appropriate forum/setting and with the right audience. Third, have confidence in your own abilities, but also never lose sight of what others bring to the table and be open to alternative points of view. Fourth, rethink your perspective on time. Careers are built over decades not months. Think through what you can realistically achieve in the near- to medium-term and acknowledge the tradeoffs. Be nice to yourself; the tradeoffs become much less stark when you take a longer-term perspective. Deanne Melloy Endo Pharmaceuticals The advice that I give to other women in the healthcare arena is play to their strengths, be confident, and identify opportunities that can increase their knowledge base. Half of the battle is being prepared; the other half is having the enthusiasm to deliver the message. Know what you are talking about and do it with confidence. Beverley Brookshaw MedPointe Pharmaceuticals Newcomers to the industry should obtain a solid base and background in the industry. It is important to be very flexible and be open to a variety of assignments to gain a good understanding of your organization and the interdependencies/synergies of departments. They should take full advantage of all the organization has to offer and continually develop their skills and competencies. People are a company’s most valuable resource and individual growth and development are mutually beneficial to the employee as well as the organization. Meg Anderson Ortho Biotech I would tell women: go for it. The healthcare arena is filled with many diverse and talented women and it offers a myriad of professional opportunities. I would suggest that women new to this industry create a solid network of cross-functional colleagues and that they leverage these networks to achieve their goals. Sarah Boyce Novartis pharmaceuticals My advice is: be clear on what you need to develop but even clearer about what you are really good at and play to your strengths. Be open and be ready to learn lessons from which ever direction these may come. Never be afraid to have the courage to take on a tough assignment. In my experience, this is when you learn the most. Make sure you enjoy what you do; it will help make you truly great. Linda Bennett Publicis Healthcare Communications The healthcare arena is comprised of some of the smartest people that I have worked with. It is an environment that requires a deep understanding of science and strategy and where they converge. People you are working with will have this understanding and expect that you will too. I would encourage anyone starting off in healthcare to do the following: surround yourself with good strategists; spend time in the field as a sales representative or with sales representatives to gain a good understanding of the primary audience; specialize because having a deep understanding of highly specialized marketplaces such as oncology and HIV are invaluable. Andrea Kistner EKR Therapeutics As someone who is new to the healthcare arena, I would advise drawing upon experience in the business world to develop your career goals. Find a niche you enjoy that sets you apart and look for ways to explore that path in the healthcare industry. Your history in other positions and areas of business can help to demonstrate your diversified abilities. Seek out education mentors in your field. These people have experience and knowledge that you need to tap to enhance your performance. Aimee Roca Wishbone My biggest piece of advice would be: never say never. The possibilities are endless and the healthcare industry encompasses so many disciplines that you may find yourself in an opportunity that is great and unexpected. You might have an opportunity to work in a new therapeutic area, on a product launch, or in a different sector of the industry, or even all three at the same time. Take every new experience as an opportunity to further develop your skills, illustrate how effective you are, and explore elements of the industry. Take advantage of what is presented to you and go for it. After the energy has been spent and the work is finished and you are still looking for a different challenge, then you will find the lessons you have learned can be applied to new challenges. Above all, learn and grow from mentors, colleagues, those who report to you, and never dismiss someone as not being a person you can learn from. Lisa Chobanian Publicis Medical Education Group First and foremost it’s important to have clear goals. If you don’t know where you are going, how will you know how to get there? Secondly, embrace, rather than shy away from, difficult situations. Taking the predictable path may feel comfortable but personal and professional growth often comes through working on those challenges that, at first, may seem insurmountable. Seek out a mentor and role model. Identify someone whose management style and career you respect. Learn from their actions and behaviors. Seek guidance and advice from them. Finally, make time for career development. Everyone is responsible for their own development so take charge and be sure to create your own development opportunities. Bridget Cleff Shire Pharmaceuticals The reward of a career in healthcare is the overarching contribution of making a difference in individuals’ health and lives by applying both business and science expertise. It’s important to gain firsthand exposure to the needs of the healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers whether through involvement with patient-advocacy groups or other opportunities to speak with individuals who are dealing with health conditions on a daily basis. Staying current with the market and understanding provider, patient, and caregiver needs will provide you with clarity as you manage business decisions. To address these needs find mentors in both the business and science arenas to enrich your ability to deliver excellence in healthcare products or services. Corinne LeGoff Sanofi-aventis Future leaders who are joining healthcare and pharmaceutical organizations today have the fantastic advantage of being able to view every situation they face with a fresh eye. It is crucial that they try to keep this “freshness” of views, which will allow them to adapt to changing conditions by finding innovative solutions to new problems. I would also recommend that they focus their career development on garnering a variety of experiences by accepting or soliciting diverse types of assignments even if it means moving beyond their comfort zone. Such moves will be hugely beneficial to their career, allowing them to increase their technical competence and also to broaden their repertoire of behaviors and enhance their political savvy. Xio Curry Scientific Advantage My first piece of advice is to find a mentor in their organization who is willing to help them learn and provide opportunities to gain experience in the area in which they are seeking growth and development. I would also encourage them to join the HBA and attend HBA seminars and workshops so they can elevate their skills and learn about other areas in the healthcare industry. The HBA is also a great place to network and meet others who are in the industry. Networking and having access to a wide range of people in the healthcare industry brings you one step closer to attaining your goals in that arena. Bridget Cleff — Shire Pharmaceuticals The reward of a career in healthcare is the overarching contribution of making a difference in individuals’ health and lives by applying both business and science expertise. Keeshia Muhammad — Altana Pharma Leadership is about influence. It’s the capcity to influence others by unleashing the power and potential of people and organizations for the greater good. Rachel DiPaolo — Health and Wellness Education Partners As I reflect on my own career, the jobs that seemed so menial to me when I first started have given me great perspective and understanding at this stage. Jina Melnyk — ImpactRx My advice is to surround yourself with people who are forward thinking, intelligent, and professional. Michele Korfin — Celgene For a new individual entering the healthcare field, the key to success is to always remember who the main focus is: the patient. Dr. Janet Loesberg — Pfizer Goals should include stakeholder networks, personal goals — what you want to achieve outside of work– specific work goals, and personal/career development goals. Dr. Kimberly Irish — Palio As a member of the medical strategies team at Palio, I was honored to be nominated because it demonstrates the importance of scientific insight both to our business and our clients. Marylou McNally — Dorland Praise is a wonderful validation, but we learn and grow the most when we are challenged to be more. Julie Adrian — Chandler Chicco Agency My advice is to be a voracious student of the industry and keep abreast of the ever-changing environment. Stefanie Vajapey — BusinessEdge BusinessEdge Solutions has afforded me many mentors throughout my career, but my main inspiration has been Joanne Metta-Sullivan, who was my first manager at the company and continues to be a guiding light. Amy Duda — Sudler & Hennessey I am inspired by good leaders who radiate passion, balance, and good humor. Dr. Ruju Srivastava — Millennium Pharmaceuticals My parents taught me to be strong-willed, tough-minded, and competitive, but also kind and caring. Dana Regan — Torre Lazur McCann Marci Piasecki, CEO of Torre Lazur McCann, had blind faith in me. I admire her passion for the business, her ability to mentor team members, and her contagious enthusiasm. Julie Adrian Head of Chandler Chicco’s Los Angeles Office Chandler Chicco Agency Julie’s passion, leadership, and dedication have been unwavering. She is truly an inspiration to all those around her. Meg Anderson Group Product Director Ortho Biotech Products LP Meg has an unbridled passion to drive business results. Her deep understanding of her customers and their markets allows her to consistently be at the top of her game. She has solid analytical skills, strong marketing competencies, and the ability to think strategically. Deidre Arnerich-Roniger Director, Market Planning Genentech Inc. Deidre is a strong developer of people who attracts the best and brightest to her teams. Her constant focus on making herself and those around her better has resulted in high-performing teams and outstanding results in all her roles. Michelene Assad Senior Director, Sales Analysis and Reporting, Total Data Solutions, an inVentiv Health company Michelene successfully balances the need to deliver outstanding results daily, while providing innovative solutions to meet the future needs of clients. Melissa J. Barlow Sales Director Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc. Melissa is an exceptional manager of talent and, as a result, is responsible for developing a large group of successful employees throughout the company. Lisa A. Bednar Director, Global Medical Communications Eli Lilly and Co. Lisa is renowned for her focus on the customer and her development of people. She built Lilly’s global scientific communications function and created the company’s first corporate authorship and publication policies. Linda Bennett Executive VP, Regional Account Coordinator, Publicis SanofiLabs Publicis Healthcare Communications Group Linda has successfully mastered professional advertising, DTC, medical education, and relationship marketing in oncology, cardiovascular, women’s health, and respiratory. Bebe Bernstein VP of Operations Flashpoint Medica Bebe’s personal style, energy, and diplomacy, as well as her skills in mentoring staff members, set her apart as a Rising Star. Sarah Boyce Executive Brand Director, Gleevec and Tasigna Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. Sarah has a high level of energy, passion, and commitment for her work, which is evidenced by her successful career with Novartis. During her tenure, she has consistently exceeded expectations and has achieved superior results. Beverley Brookshaw Director, Quality Systems MedPointe Pharmaceuticals Beverley has exhibited a strong commitment to quality standards and at the same time understands the company’s business goals. Erin Brubaker Director, US New Product Planning GlaxoSmithKline US Pharmaceuticals Erin’s open and collaborative working style, positive attitude, enthusiasm, and influencing skills have earned the respect of her colleagues throughout GSK. Jody Cahill VP, Agency Operations Goble & Associates Healthcare Communications Jody exemplifies what leadership means; she has developed teams that take ownership and she continually looks for new ways to make a difference for our clients and brands. Lisa M. Castaneda General Manager, Dyslipidemia Franchise Abbott Laboratories Lisa is one of the brightest talents at Abbott today. Her work ethic, organizational commitment, and drive-for-results mentality inspire those around her. Aafia Chaudhry, M.D. Executive VP Medical Knowledge Group As business colleagues we are inspired daily by Aafia’s entrepreneurial spirit and humbled by her humanitarian efforts and passion for peer mentorship. Lisa Chobanian, RN, MS, RD Senior VP, Client Service Director Science & Medicine, a division of the Publicis Medical Education Group Lisa exhibits all of the qualities of a true leader in developing and mentoring her employees, while providing her clients with strong strategic input and innovative programming initiatives. Bridget Cleff Director, Market Research Shire Pharmaceuticals Bridget has been instrumental in the development of the communications for our new UC product. She never hesitates to step in and tackle whatever needs to be done. Christine Coleman VP, Client Services Motivation Mechanics LLC Chris embodies what healthcare marketing should really be about — making a difference in people’s lives. Erin Cramlet, PHR Senior Human Resources Manager Stryker Erin is known widely throughout the organization as an extremely talented and high-achieving star who consistently delivers top results. Xio Curry Senior Project Director Scientific Advantage LLC Xio is always up for new challenges and is ready to volunteer for more, whether it’s managing projects, training, or sharing new ideas. Debbie Deaver Managing Partner CDMiConnect, a division of Cline Davis & Mann Inc. Deb is a true partner whose drive and passion motivate clients and colleagues alike to achieve the best they can for the brand. Mary Ann DiGangi-Fallon Chief Operating Officer Copernicus Group IRB Mary Ann not only exhibits all the qualities one would expect from a Rising Star, but she has accomplished this while successfully balancing work with family life. Rachel DiPaolo VP, Program Development, Health and Wellness Education Partners, a division of Health and Wellness Partners Rachel combines integrity with tenacity to deliver incredible quality; she has been, is, and will be a star to watch. Amy Duda VP, Strategic Planning Sudler & Hennessey Amy is a consummate team player and truly deserves to be recognized as a Rising Star. Suzann Duncan Product Director, Commercial Operations Roche Pharmaceuticals Suzann provides leadership for the management of market research analyses, as well as strategic input into several brand initiatives. Eileen E. Erdos Senior Manager Ernst & Young LLP Eileen’s skills, personality, and commitment to quality and client service make her an admirable mentor to future generations. Helen Evans VP, Finance and Controller TAP Pharmaceutical Products Inc. Helen is an invaluable asset to TAP; she consistently goes beyond her responsibilities to improve the organization and our employees. Mary Jo Furnbach VP, Group Copy Supervisor DRAFTFCB Healthcare Mary Jo is smart and strategic and is the one person who every account, creative team, and client wants to work with. Nefertiti Greene VP, Marketing Par Pharmaceutical Inc. Nefertiti possesses the creativity and strategic thinking that are essential to quality marketing as well as the organizational and process skills necessary to direct an operations function. Jennifer Hayoun VP, Account Supervisor Glow Worm Jennifer exemplifies the new order of pharma marketers — one who brings fresh ideas from the consumer marketplace to classic pharma account service — paving the way for innovation in a conservative industry. Paulette A. Heath Director, Professional Affairs Tibotec Therapeutics Paulette is a tremendous leader and role model for others in our organization. She has a great deal of integrity and she displays a passion for her people, always putting them first. Lisa Hersh Senior VP, Account Director Saatchi & Saatchi Consumer Healthcare, a division of Saatchi & Saatchi Healthcare Communications Lisa uses her wide range of consumer communications experience, both domestic and global, to bring a best-practices approach to her healthcare clients. Reinilde Heyrman, M.D. Executive Director, Clinical Development Daiichi Sankyo Inc. Reinilde exhibits strong leadership, a commitment to her critical projects, and a winning attitude. Her great enthusiasm, energy, and dedication make her a notable leader within our organization. Kimberly Irish, Ph.D. VP, Medical Director Palio Communications Kim’s incredible work ethic, dedication to the members of her team, thirst for knowledge, and exemplary leadership make her a Rising Star. Marianne Jackson Executive Director, Commercial Operations AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Marianne has a passion for the people she leads, directly and indirectly. She demonstrates her commitment to all people by her service on a leadership team dedicated to our people strategy. Kathy Johnson Senior Account Director IMS Health Kathy has received numerous awards and praise from her clients in their appreciation of her work on their behalf and she delights her clients by providing excellent customer service. Emily Jordhamo VP, Accounts, Q.E.D. Communications Inc., Quintiles Medical Communications Emily’s can-do attitude, straightforward approach, and intense loyalty to her employees, her clients, and the company have inspired her team to a new level of success. Deepika Kandula, MPH, MBA Managing Director The Neighborhood, a Kinetix Group Company Through Deepika’s work with diverse populations in multiple therapeutic areas she has made great strides in the improvement of patient health. Liz Kay Director, Cramer Healthcare Practice, and VP, Account Services Cramer Liz has helped drive Cramer’s healthcare practice growth by building strong client partnerships and mentoring internal teams. Lee Ann E. Kimak Senior Director, Web Strategy and Healthcare Professional e-Marketing Wyeth Lee Ann deserves recognition as a model for the industry because of the exemplary manner in which she has succeeded in bringing innovative and productive ideas to life. Andrea Kistner Senior Finance Manager EKR Therapeutics Inc. Andrea is consistently supportive of the development and advancement of women on her team by providing coaching and guidance in the midst of a start-up company. Louise A. Koenig Art Director International Medical News Group (IMNG), a division of Elsevier Louise is a committed believer in teamwork. She motivates and mentors her staff through a balance of open communications, creativity, and fun. Michele Korfin Marketing Director, E-Marketing and Patient Education Celgene Corp. Michele is the innovator of our most important patient access and reimbursement support programs and she is a trusted member of our commercial leadership team. Michele is highly deserving of the HBA Rising Star award. Betsy Lane VP, Marketing Publicis Selling Solutions Group Betsy demonstrates dynamic, strategic acumen, great problem solving skills, and a dedication to customer service. She is an invaluable asset to our team. Janis L. Lane Human Resources Director Eisai Inc. Janis exhibits a high degree of energy and enthusiasm in everything she does. She is committed to promoting the culture, values, and vision of Eisai. Nina Leeds, Ph.D. Scientific Director The Foundation for Better Health Care, a CME provider for PROmedica Communications Inc. Nina uses her scientific and writing skills to continually improve the quality of medical education offered by the company. Corinne LeGoff VP, CNS Marketing Sanofi-Aventis Based on Corinne’s leadership, Ambien CR has been one of the most successful conversions in the industry. Pamela Lippincott VP Spectrum Science Communications Pam’s style and approach to any given situation — whether working with clients or with staff — is always “grace under fire.” She is truly a star on the rise in the healthcare communications field. Janet Loesberg, Pharm.D. Head – US Regional Medical and Research Specialists Pfizer Inc. Janet has developed and led several field-based teams, groups, and organizations resulting in significant value for Pfizer, customers, and patients. She is a great role model for others learning to balance the demands of work and family. Sally A. Maturana Group Account Director Clinical Connexion, a Connexion Healthcare Co. Sally consistently provides innovative ideas to solve our clients’ marketing challenges and always assembles the strongest team to ensure that our clients have the appropriate support. Michelle McManus Senior Account Executive Compas Inc. A bright and shining star, Michelle has quickly earned the position of Senior Account Executive through her dedication to her clients and Compas. Marylou McNally Executive VP, Group Account Director Dorland Global Corp. Marylou always performs at an extraordinary level. Her goals for her people are high, but they are never higher than those she sets for herself. Deanne Melloy Group Marketing Director Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. Deanne looks beyond what is needed in her immediate area of responsibility and focuses her time and attention on the needs of the organization as a whole. Her hard work, positive attitude, and effective solutions are assets for Endo. Jeanina Melnyk, CPA Controller ImpactRx Inc. Jina comes to the office every day with a smile on her face and a willingness and desire to work with all ImpactRx’s employees to effectuate great team results. Valerie Metil Senior Director of Operations, Health Management Services Innovex Inc. Valerie directs project teams of clinical educators who interact with patients, practitioners, and their staffs to improve treatment and compliance in ways that make a big difference in helping patients lead longer, healthier lives. Katie Mihelich Account Director Siren Interactive Corp. Katie demonstrates unparalleled leadership and focus in delivering the highest quality results possible for Siren’s clients. Keeshia Muhammad Corporate Senior Director, Strategy and Commercial Development Altana Pharma US Inc., a Nycomed Co. Through her growth as a leader, Keeshia succeeded in molding a diverse and talented team of people into a high-performance team and among her many other accomplishments she prepared the company for its first U.S. launch of a significant branded product. Marjorie Nelson-Perry VP, Group Account Director Brand Pharm Marge is committed to having her team be successful by providing opportunities for team members to grow and develop, while maintaining a supporting presence for them. Georgia Nikolaros Marketing Solutions Manager Elsevier Inc. Georgia’s outstanding customer service makes her a key partner to our customers and an asset to our company. Kristin Ortlieb VP, Data and Quality Management Alliance Healthcare Information Inc. In all successful companies there are individuals who are intelligent, hard working, personable, and highly effective — the perfect combination of traits. Kristin is one of those people. Cheryl Paprota Senior Manager, Quality Services Organon USA Inc. Cheryl’s project management skills, technical knowledge, and leadership skills have led to her continued selection as a team member for key company projects. Marla S. Persky VP, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. Marla provides sage legal counsel and exceptional leadership to our company and specifically to our corporate management committee. Jane Purkis Executive VP, Director of Client Services Medicus New York Jane’s decisive, yet collaborative style, accompanied by her solutions-oriented approach, makes her a great leader and role model. Dana K. Regan VP, Managing Director Torre Lazur Managed Markets, a division of Torre Lazur McCann Dana has spearheaded new business efforts that have more than doubled the volume of our managed markets business, which has won accolades from colleagues and clients alike. Aimee Roca, MBA VP, Account Supervisor Wishbone/ITP Inc. Aimee embodies everything Wishbone is about. She is incredibly smart, efficient, and thorough. Her can-do attitude and her drive to succeed makes Aimee our Rising Star. Sacha Schroeder VP, Senior Account Director Surge Worldwide Healthcare Communications Sacha’s relentless energy, deep marketing insights, and strong presentation skills make her an invaluable asset to our organization. Mary Ann Seamon Search Consultant JBK Associates Mary Ann’s client focus, unwavering energy, dedication to high standards, experience, and knowledge of the industry have been some of the keys to our growth and reputation. Janine Serio Senior VP, Creative Director LLNS Inc. Janine excels at so many things; it would be a disservice to single out just one of her talents — designer, leader, mentor, role model, colleague, and friend. Kari Seymour Senior Director, Training and Development Group Vox Medica Inc. Kari is as vivacious as she is versatile, and she has been a driving force in establishing, and now growing, the company’s business unit dedicated to industry training and development. Alya Sherman Director, Media Strategies Communications Media Inc. Alya’s leadership resulted in improved morale, productivity, and customer service, all of which achieved unprecedented business results for our Philadelphia office. Ruju Bhatt Srivastava, M.D. Director, Business Development Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc. Ruju is not only a great thinker, she is a great leader who is able to mobilize teams to deliver breakthrough results. Anita St. Clair Senior VP, Management Supervisor HealthEd – The Patient Education Agency Anita is an outstanding leader. Her unflagging optimism and motivational skills have been instrumental to HealthEd’s dramatic growth in the past 18 months. Martha M. Suarez VP, Management Supervisor Ogilvy Healthworld Martha is a strong leader, a strategic thinker, and an empowering manager; she is a true role model. Deborah LV Tanner President Covance Central Laboratory Services and Senior Corporate VP Covance Inc. With a wealth of scientific, regulatory, industry, and business experience — and most importantly, inspirational leadership — Deborah led Central Labs to win the 2006 Business Unit of the Year Award. Stefanie Vajapey Project Manager BusinessEdge Solutions Inc. Stefanie demonstrates a desire and ability to excel in delivery as well as business development. She is truly a Rising Star and someone who will undoubtedly continue to contribute to our success in 2007. Kathy Veralli Director of Marketing and Operations, Consumer Division Dowden Health Media Kathy consistently demonstrates professionalism, a positive can-do attitude, and excellent analytical skills that are well-received by our clients in this complex custom publishing business unit. Tejal Vishalpura, Pharm.D. Associate Director Xcenda Tejal brings a daily enthusiasm and dedication to success. She promotes innovative and intelligent solutions for our clients. Laura Wagner VP, Sales Operations Life Sciences Group Advanstar Communications Inc. Laura is a committed leader and performer; she inspires everyone she works with to achieve new levels of success through clear communications and process improvements. Shay Weisbrich Senior Director, Diabetes Marketing Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc. Shay has tireless mental energy that enables her to focus on today’s priorities and tomorrow’s possibilities. She is indeed an outstanding role model for her fellow leaders in the healthcare industry. Eve Wilson, Ph.D. Director of CME Services Innovia Education Institute Eve’s knowledge, professionalism, and commitment to the highest personal and professional standards always shines through. Sandy Yoraschek VP, Group Account Supervisor Grey Healthcare Group Inc. Sandy Yoraschek is the type of executive clients love. She is smart, strategic, and proactive. She understands what makes great advertising and always goes the extra mile to achieve that success for her clients. Jenna Zamelsky Senior VP, Group Account Director LifeBrands Jenna’s leadership and strategic insights are recognized by both client and agency teams. Deborah Tanner — Covance Leaders need to have a passion for what they do and this passion will inspire the people they lead. Mary Ann Digangi-Fallon — Copernicus Group IRB One of the most important leadership qualities an individual can possess is the ability to create a work environment of trust and mutual respect at all levels within the organization. Shay Weisbrich — Takeda Pharmaceuticals By inspiring others to believe in the possibilities within themselves and within the organization, leaders then weave those possibilities together into a strategy that inspires the organization and enables success beyond the ordinary. Jen Hayoun — Glow Worm More than inspiration, a leader must provide a concrete plan and not just a lofty vision. Kari Seymour — Vox Medica A leader is not always the person with the loudest voice or with all of the ideas or answers, but one who provides others with the guidance and motivation to achieve the big or the small. Betsy Lane — Publicis Selling Solutions Group Doing the right thing for the right reasons is what distinguishes truly great leaders. Eileen Erdos — Ernst & Young A good leader is not only defined by what she has done but how she has done it. Michelle McManus — Compas The best leaders pride themselves on having developed and nurtured new successful leaders. Valuable leaders energize a group to believe in its purpose. Marjorie Nelson-Perry — Brand Pharm The two most important qualities in a leader include the ability to inspire others and the gift of objectivity. Sacha Schroeder — Surge Worldwide Healthcare It’s important to lead from the front. This begins with exceptional and collaborative client service at every level, because ideas can come from any team member. Pamela Lippincott — Spectrum Science Communications The first responsibility of a leader is to make leaders of others. Katie Mihelich — Siren Interactive Great leadership is a combination of listening and communicating. Erin Brubaker — GlaxoSmithKline US Pharmaceuticals I find that the best, most impactful leaders are the ones who really listen to people and understand not only the “what,” but the “how” and “why” of a situation. Melissa Barlow — Solvay One of the most important leadership qualities is demonstrating an unwavering sense of empathy to your team. Lee Ann Kimak — Wyeth Leadership can happen at any level, no matter the title or position. It is more about the qualities somebody embodies and how a person can motivate others to succeed. Helen Evans — TAP Pharmaceutical An effective leader is confident, has great instincts, makes sound decisions, and always conducts herself in the most professional and ethical of manners. Louise Koenig — IMNG/Elsevier A leader realizes that what seems to be difficult and challenging can be achieved through dedication and a willingness to succeed. Dr. Eve Wilson — INNOVIA Education Institute Effective leadership requires a capacity to anticipate and embrace change and a talent for responding appropriately. These are essential traits in today’s environment. Kathy Johnson — IMS Health A good leader provides support by giving people the right tools and resources to get the job done and serves as a coach, mentor, and cheerleader. Liz Kay — Cramer I have found that honesty and accountability for my actions are the best way to move a team in the same direction. This best practice creates an atmosphere for others to step up to excellence.

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